A National High School Assembly Program Engages Students on Climate Change

102914_ACEassembly_OrigThe Alliance for Climate Education (ACE) is a non-profit organization that conducts climate education assembly programs in high schools across the country. Their mission is to educate America’s high school students about the science behind climate change and inspire them to do something about it—while having fun along the way. An evaluation of ACE’s entertainment-education program in 49 high schools  found that students who participated in ACE assembly programs became more knowledgeable about and engaged in the issue of climate change, and changed their communication and conservation behavior in a number of important ways. Over 1.8 million high-school students have attended an ACE assembly since 2008, and over half of the schools served now have active ‘green teams.’ The study, conducted by researchers from the George Mason Center for Climate Change Communication (4C), Yale, and Stanford, suggests that such forms of entertainment-education could play an important role in shifting scientific misconceptions about climate change.
 

Evaluation of a National High School Entertainment-Education Program: The Alliance for Climate Education

 
In 2009, 4C presented the Alliance for Climate Education (ACE) — a non-profit organization that conducts climate education assembly programs in high schools across the country — with its Climate Change Communicator of the Year Award.
 
Subsequently, 4C, Yale and Stanford researchers collaborated with ACE to evaluate the effectiveness of its assembly program. The exciting results of that evaluation were published this week in Climatic Change.
 
In short, students who participated in ACE assembly programs became more knowledgeable about and engaged in the issue of climate change, and they changed their communication and conservation behavior in a number of important ways.
 
We encourage you to learn more about ACE (http://www.acespace.org/) and to download the free article that details its evaluation results:
 
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10584-014-1274-1
 
Image Credit: Alliance for Climate Education

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