Tag Archives: New York Times
Hispanics and climate

Why Climate Change Is Such an Important Issue for Hispanics

As a recent New York Times/Stanford poll found, climate change is becoming an increasingly big concern for all Americans. But a deeper dive into the survey showed that concern is highest among Hispanics. This New York Times article explains that Hispanics are more likely to feel climate change affects them personally, and more likely to support […]

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New York Times poll

New Poll: Climate Deniers Won’t Win America’s Vote

American concern about climate change and support for solutions continues to rise, and it’s getting harder for elected officials to ignore. In a new poll, two out of three Americans (and 48 percent of Republicans) said that a candidate who advocated fighting climate change would be more likely to earn their vote. They were less […]

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060414CoalPlant_Square

Americans More Convinced Than Ever That Climate Changed Is Caused By Humans, New Poll

Nearly half of Americans (46%) believe that climate change is having a serious impact now, according to a new poll by CBS News / The New York Times. Moreover, more than half — 54% — of Americans believe that climate change is human-caused, the highest percentage ever recorded by a CBS News / The New York Times […]

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01.03.14ClimateCoverage_square

2013 Sees Rebound in Climate Coverage Worldwide

2013 saw a 30 percent uptick in stories about climate change issues from 2012, according to a recent analysis released by The Daily Climate. The analysis found 24,000 news articles, opinions and editorials in mainstream news outlets worldwide that had to do with climate change issues, up from 18,546 stories in 2012. The overall increase […]

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New York Times desk

New York Times’ climate coverage plummets

Climate coverage in The New York Times dropped dramatically last year, according to a recent analysis featured in Joanna Foster’s blog post on Climate Progress this week. But it wasn’t because there were fewer stories about climate to report on. It was because the The New York Times closed its environment desk, dismantled its Green Blog, […]

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Virality

Communications gone viral: the role of emotion

No one wants to post a video or an article that will only be seen once. People want their content to go viral. Indeed, it’s this kind of scale that we at ecoAmerica strive for, and it’s this kind of scale that we encourage in our climate colleagues around the country. The tricky part is […]

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bill nye 2

Bill Nye the Science Guy on Climate Change Deniers: “I Say Bring it On”

Bill Nye, known to a generation of kids as Bill Nye the Science Guy, has taken on a new role in life as documented in this New York Times piece. It portrays Nye’s jump from enthusiastic, hilarious kids-TV host to what he sees as a different but related role: fighting climate deniers and other anti-science […]

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Climate Change Doubt Is Tea Party Article of Faith

Climate Change Doubt Is Tea Party Article of Faith

In this article, John Broder demonstrates how the climate change discussion in Indiana political races has been heavily influenced by the Tea Party and other fossil fuel interests who have instilled doubt or denial in the American people, particularly in Americans of Christian faith. (more…)

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Want the Good News First?

Want the Good News First?

In this New York Times Op-Ed post, Thomas Friedman notes the failure of the US Senate to pass emissions reduction legislation and their failure to act in general to protect the Gulf ecosystem and reduce our dependency on fossil fuels. Experts quoted in the piece warn of the yet-to-be seen long term impact of the […]

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Paul Krugman cites ecoAmerica on Climate rage

Paul Krugman cites ecoAmerica on Climate rage

In his online post on Climate Rage yesterday, Paul Krugman cites ecoAmerica's American Climate Values Survey (ACVS). In trying to discern the cause for all the anti-environmental and climate anger, he references the ACVS and it's finding that environmentalism, and climate especially, are feminine. Krugman suggests that this and anti-intellectualism are two culture issues at […]

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