Tag Archives: george mason
climatechange-report-cvr2-apr13

Half of Americans Save the World While Shopping

The latest report out from Yale and George Mason University’s April 2013 polling shows more fascinating habits on the part of Americans in both consumer and citizen behavior, and much to be hopeful about. According to the most recent release, “Americans’ Actions to Limit Global Warming,” half of Americans regularly consider the environmental impact of […]

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climatechange-report-cvr1-apr13

Yale Poll: Climate Change Belief Drops 7%, Likely Influenced by Cold Winter

Last week, Yale and George Mason Universities released their latest report on American attitudes about climate, and found that belief in climate change has dropped 7 percent in just half a year – mostly, they surmised, due to a cold winter. Will Oremus at Slate responded to this by writing about unscientific humans are. But for […]

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Climate Change Gets Personal

Today, Yale and George Mason released their most recent findings on American sentiment on extreme weather and climate change, from a phone poll conducted in April. They found that 85 percent of Americans had personally experienced an extreme weather event during the last year, 80 percent had a family member or friend who’d experienced one, […]

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Voting

Across Party Lines, Americans Support Action To Reduce Global Warming [Report]

A report titled “The Political Benefits to Taking a Pro-Climate Stand in 2013” by Yale and George Mason University found many advantages to climate action in government. In fact, it seems like a no-brainer for a politician to support climate initiatives. The report found that the majority of Democrats, Independents, and Republicans support efforts to […]

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Climate & Environmental Attitudes in America: 2010

Climate & Environmental Attitudes in America: 2010

According to a recent Newsweek article, “Millions of Americans have changed their minds about global warming over the past two years – deciding it isn’t happening, or isn’t due to human activities such as burning coal and oil, or that it isn’t a serious threat.” Click here to view an ecoAmerica analysis of recent major […]

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