Clean Energy Solutions Are Gaining Momentum

111914_SolarFarm_originalThe arguments in favor of renewable energy like wind and solar keep getting stronger. As this Bloomberg article recently noted, solar power is expected to be as affordable or more affordable than standard electricity in 36 states by 2016. That gives households and business all the more reason to invest in solar. Wind power is also gaining traction: this week, Google, IKEA, and SunEdison announced major investments in wind farms. They did so not only to help fight climate change, but because it makes good economic sense.
 
Through our research, we’ve found that 4 in 5 Americans support clean energy solutions. However, many still feel climate solutions are too costly or involve too many sacrifices, which is in conflict with the “American Dream” of success and prosperity. To help gain wider support for clean energy, we need to show how it ties into American values by creating jobs, helping businesses thrive, and helping families save money, as well as reducing pollution.
 

While You Were Getting Worked Up Over Oil Prices, This Just Happened to Solar

Tom Randall, Contributor to Bloomberg
 
Every time fossil fuels get cheaper, people lose interest in solar deployment. That may be about to change.
 
After years of struggling against cheap natural gas prices and variable subsidies, solar electricity is on track to be as cheap or cheaper than average electricity-bill prices in 47 U.S. states – in 2016, according to a Deutsche Bank report published this week. That’s assuming the U.S. maintains its 30 percent tax credit on system costs, which is set to expire that same year.
 
Even if the tax credit drops to 10 percent, solar will soon reach price parity with conventional electricity in well over half the nation: 36 states. Gone are the days when solar panels were an exotic plaything of Earth-loving rich people. Solar is becoming mainstream, and prices will continue to drop as the technology improves and financing becomes more affordable, according to the report.
 
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Image credit: Chris Sattlberger/Getty Images

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