American Teens’ Knowledge of Climate Change

YaleProjectClimateChange The new report "American Teens' Knowledge on Climate Change" by Yale Project on Climate Change Communication found that teens aged 13-17 have "important gaps in knowledge and common misconceptions on climate change." Teens are 9% behind adults on believing in climate change and only 29% have thought a lot or some about global warming, but over 70% say they would like to know more about global warming.  The study's findings also suggest informal educational venues, like zoos, aquariums, and natural history museums "are important places for teens (and adults) to learn about complex issues like climate change."

 

Posted by Yale Project on Climate Change
April 18, 2011

American Teens’ Knowledge of Climate Change

Download the PDF of the full report.

American Teens’ Knowledge of Climate Change reports results from a national study of what American teens in middle and high school understand about how the climate system works, and the causes, impacts and potential solutions to global warming. This report describes how knowledge of climate change varies across both American teens and adults. Using a straight grading scale, 25 percent of teens received a passing grade (A, B, or C), compared to 30 percent of American adults. While knowledge levels vary, these results also indicate that relatively few teens have an in-depth understanding of climate change.

Leiserowitz, A., Smith, N. & Marlon, J.R. (2011) American Teens’ Knowledge of Climate Change.
Yale University. New Haven, CT: Yale Project on Climate Change Communication.

One Response to “American Teens’ Knowledge of Climate Change”

  1. > “The study’s findings also suggest informal educational venues, like zoos, aquariums, and natural history museums “are important places for teens (and adults) to learn about complex issues like climate change.”
    But what if they go to the Smithsonian?
    (Is there any sort of “peer review” available for science exhibits? If not, whose bailiwick would this be, who could get it started?)
    (I’m thinking of the Koch-funded human evolution/climate change exhibit)

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